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Fiji break: as a conclusion
Fiji break: as a conclusion
Fiji break: as a conclusion
Fiji break: as a conclusion
Fiji break: as a conclusion
Fiji break: as a conclusion
Fiji break: as a conclusion
Fiji break: as a conclusion
Fiji break: as a conclusion
Fiji break: as a conclusion
Fiji break: as a conclusion
Fiji break: as a conclusion
Fiji break: as a conclusion
Fiji break: as a conclusion
Fiji break: as a conclusion
Fiji break: as a conclusion
Fiji break: as a conclusion
Fiji break: as a conclusion
Fiji break: as a conclusion
Fiji break: as a conclusion
Fiji break: as a conclusion
Fiji break: as a conclusion
Fiji break: as a conclusion

As a conclusion to my trip, because this is also what Fiji is about, I finally went on a sandy beach resort, napping under a palm tree or snorkelling in the warm pacific ocean. I have to admit that it was two really relaxing days I spent on the south coast of Viti Levu. But as much as I like to know what chemicals I am eating with the food I buy or what it implies to get a book from 'amazon' rather than from my local book shop, I couldn't leave without asking a few questions to the employees working there.

The staff in these hotels is paid 2$60 per hour, minimum wage set by the goverment, when a teacher or a police officer is paid 1200$ monthly.

A kilo of rice costs 2$, petrol for the car is 3$ a liter and renting a small appartment 400$ a month.

Both the places I went to were owned by overseas landlords (from Australia and Singapore).

One night in a very basic dorm (wich most of the resorts don't offer, usually having just luxury rooms) costs 40$, twice as much as a two beds shared room in Suva Hotel.

Thanks to their community way of life, most of the Fijian people have a house to stay -self built, wih the help of the other inhabitant of the village and usually shared with other members of the family- and food everyday from what the community harvests or hunt, otherwise I doubt that they would be able to afford feeding a family by working in one of these resorts.

Fijians are happy and very welcoming people, and nothing never makes you feel uncomfortable about staying in these places wich only tourists can afford. Also, I did not thorougly verify the informations I've been given, but still, I was glad that most of the money I spent went to Fijian families, as a little help for the food and accomodation they provided with always lots of truth and faith... Holidays can also be fair trade.

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